Sutton Scarsdale Hall

Sutton Scarsdale Hall

This morning we headed out, in the glorious Bank Holiday sunshine, to Sutton Scarsdale Hall, a Grade I listed Georgian stately home ruin.

Origins of the site have been dated back to Saxon times but the current structure is believed to be the fourth or fifth built on the site. The current house was commissioned in 1724, by Nicholas Leke, 4th Earl of Scarsdale, and utilised parts of an earlier building, from about 1469, to create the Georgian mansion with gardens.

The house changed hands a number of times before being sold to a company of asset strippers. The roof was stripped of its lead, massive wooden joists were removed, and many of the finely decorate rooms were sold off as architectural salvage. Some parts of the building were shipped to the United States, three interiors are displayed at the Museum of Art in Philadelphia, and a pine-panelled room is at the Huntington Library, California, having been offered to the Huntingdon after it was used as a set for the film Kitty in 1934.

The ruined hall was saved from demolition by the writer Sir Osbert Sitwell, who bought it in 1946 after he had heard of the sale to dismantle the stonework. Work was carried our over a number of years to preserve what remained of the structure, before it was handed to the Department of the Environment and work to secure the structure from further deterioration was undertaken. The hall is now in the care of English Heritage.

12 Brown Bottles...

12 Brown Bottles...

Pretty Darned Chuffed...

Pretty Darned Chuffed...