It's Not Sacher's, It's Mine!

It's Not Sacher's, It's Mine!

Sachertorte

The Boys Do Bake Off - Series 2, Ep.8 - Final

For the final of GBBO series 2, Mary set the contestants the challenge of baking the famous Viennese Sachertorte and it's her recipe that we're using today. 20th Century Sachertorte history is mired in disputed claims over the source of the 'original' recipe. That aside, we do know that this rich chocolate cake with it's ganche coating began life sometime in the 18th Century before finding fame at the hands of Franz Sacher, a young apprentice pastry chef working in Vienna in 1832.

The Gents knew the day would come when they would tackle this icon of the pastry world, but lay you fears aside. This is actually quite a simple recipe and the hardest part is simply justifying how much 'bad' stuff you use to make it!

Start by melting your dark chocolate for the cake mix. This needs to cool down a little as you'll be adding it to softened butter and you don't want a melted oily mess. In a clean bowl, beat your butter and caster sugar until light and fluffy. Next add your vanilla extract before mixing in your cooled melted chocolate.

Separate your eggs and combine the yolks with your chocolate batter then fold in your sieved flour and ground almonds. At this point your mix will be rather stiff and looking a far cry from a standard cake batter.

Whisk your egg whites until firm, but not dry, and add a third of these to your chocolate mix. Beat well to slacken the mixture before carefully folding in the remaining egg whites. You want to make sure there are no white lumps left, whilst also taking care not to knock all the air out. Pour into a greased and lined tin and bake until the cake springs back under your finger. This recipe states 45-50 minutes at 180 degrees fan but, knowing our oven is on the hot side, we cooked our cake for 40 minutes at 160 and it was just right.

Leave to cool and don't panic when it sinks a little in the middle. A torte is rich and dense, so a gentle sink is to be expected! Once cool, paint generously with sieved apricot jam. Once this has set it's time for the ganache topping. Simply heat your cream, add your chocolate directly into the hot cream and mix until it's dissolved. Within seconds you'll have a glossy ganache that's already at the perfect spreading consistency. Cover your cake generously and leave to cool.

Finally the all important writing. Heat a little milk chocolate and place in a small piping bag. You can make one simply with greaseproof paper. Take a deep breath and, when your nerves have settled, pipe the word Sacher on your torte.

So there you have it. An iconic cake that's not nearly as hard to make as you think. The tricky part is keeping your hands off it!

For the final of GBBO series 2, Mary set the contestants the challenge of baking the famous Viennese Sachertorte and it's her recipe that we're using today. 20th Century Sachertorte history is mired in disputed claims over the source of the 'original' recipe. That aside, we do know that this rich chocolate cake with it's ganche coating began life sometime in the 18th Century before finding fame at the hands of Franz Sacher, a young apprentice pastry chef working in Vienna in 1832.

The Gents knew the day would come when they would tackle this icon of the pastry world, but lay you fears aside. This is actually quite a simple recipe and the hardest part is simply justifying how much 'bad' stuff you use to make it!

Start by melting your dark chocolate for the cake mix. This needs to cool down a little as you'll be adding it to softened butter and you don't want a melted oily mess. In a clean bowl, beat your butter and caster sugar until light and fluffy. Next add your vanilla extract before mixing in your cooled melted chocolate.

Separate your eggs and combine the yolks with your chocolate batter then fold in your sieved flour and ground almonds. At this point your mix will be rather stiff and looking a far cry from a standard cake batter.

Whisk your egg whites until firm, but not dry, and add a third of these to your chocolate mix. Beat well to slacken the mixture before carefully folding in the remaining egg whites. You want to make sure there are no white lumps left, whilst also taking care not to knock all the air out. Pour into a greased and lined tin and bake until the cake springs back under your finger. This recipe states 45-50 minutes at 180 degrees fan but, knowing our oven is on the hot side, we cooked our cake for 40 minutes at 160 and it was just right.

Leave to cool and don't panic when it sinks a little in the middle. A torte is rich and dense, so a gentle sink is to be expected! Once cool, paint generously with sieved apricot jam. Once this has set it's time for the ganache topping. Simply heat your cream, add your chocolate directly into the hot cream and mix until it's dissolved. Within seconds you'll have a glossy ganache that's already at the perfect spreading consistency. Cover your cake generously and leave to cool.

Finally the all important writing. Heat a little milk chocolate and place in a small piping bag. You can make one simply with greaseproof paper. Take a deep breath and, when your nerves have settled, pipe the word Sacher on your torte.

So there you have it. An iconic cake that's not nearly as hard to make as you think. The tricky part is keeping your hands off it!

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Waste Not, Want Not...

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