Breader Together...

Breader Together...

Metta Bread - Spiced 60:40 Wholemeal:Rye Sourdough

#TwitterBakeAlong is back and we're baking with Jack! The fabulous Baking Nanna and Robert Allen have teamed up with rising bread superstar (see what we did there?!) Jack Sturgess (Bake with Jack). This happy chappy is out to prove (sorry!) that anyone and everyone can enjoy and master the art of baking real bread. The Gents are no strangers to Jack's recipes, with his versatile cob loaf being one of their 'go to' recipes. However, this week we thought we'd mix things up a bit.

With the planet seemingly on the brink of nuclear Armageddon and global tensions running high, we thought we should maybe have a go at celebrating the awesomeness and loveliness that exists when we all just get along! Step forward our metta bread.

We started slowly with a bubbly rich rye sourdough starter. Whilst milled flour is most certainly available throughout the world, bleached white flour is not. This delicious loaf comes to life with a wholesome wholewheat flour (that's the one with the bits still in it) and nutty dark rye. This combination of flours is delicious in its own right but, today we're all about embracing big bold global flavours.

To our flour we've added black onion seeds, or Nigella seeds, a favourites of many Middle-Eastern recipes. Next in we added whole cumin seeds, black mustard seeds and a heady heap of ground cardamom seeds. Keeping with these, now distinctly Indian spices, we added a good pinch of tumeric. This dried and ground root is yet another fad food that people claim cures all sorts of unfortunate ailments. For us a burst of colour.

We set about making our dough as normal, mixing our sponge (an overnight mix of sourdough starter, water and flour) with more water before adding our spiced flour. Although you don't need any sugar to feed your yeast, we added a touch of honey to balance the slight bitterness of the raw spices. 20 minutes for the flour to soak in all the water and we added our salt.

After three separate 50 minute rests and a small stretch, we shaped our dough and placed it in our banneton. Another two hours and it was almost ready for the oven. A quick slash with a knife created a little sunshine on our loaf before it was placed carefully in a very hot cast iron pot with a lid. After 25 minutes the lid came off and our loaf got its final crusty bake.

Fragrant, mouthwatering and enticing. Go on, break bread with someone...

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