LPGT - Bloomsbury to Shoreditch and back...

LPGT - Bloomsbury to Shoreditch and back...

Bloomsbury to Shoreditch and back...

Today's walk follows the London Parks and Gardens Trust's Bloomsbury to Shoreditch and back 'cycle ride'. The walk can easily be split into smaller sections. Click here for the full route map.

Distance: around 9.5 miles.

Salters Garden originally opened in 1981 but was later redesigned as a knot garden in 1995, by David Hicks, to commemorate the 600th anniversary of the Worshipful Company of Salters. Charterhouse Square is a pentagonal garden with diagonal walks, lined with lime trees and bordered on three sides by mansions and on the fourth side by old monastic buildings. Lincoln's Inn was founded in or before 1422 and has six separate gardens - North Lawn, Benchers' Lawn, New Square, Gatehouse Court, Kitchen Garden and Stone Buildings. Lincoln's Inn Fields was laid out in 1735 but it did not become a public garden until 1894.

Coram's Fields are what remains of the forecourt of the Foundling Hospital, an organisation to care for destitute children, which was established in the 18th century by Captain Thomas Coram. It is now a children's play area and no adult can enter the field without a child. Mecklenburgh Square was named after Queen Charlotte, who before her marriage to George III was Princes of Mecklenburgh-Strelitz. It is a private square, but is open to the public during the Open Garden Squares WeekendCalthorpe Project Community Garden is a 1.2 acre space which opened in 1984 after local people campaigned against the land being sold for development. St. George's Gardens were once a meadow and then burial grounds in 1713 for two nearby churches - St. George Bloomsbury and St. George the Martyr. They closed in 1854 and after some years of neglect they reopened in 1889 as part of the movement to make overgrown graveyards and other urban spaces into 'open air sitting rooms for the poor'.

Brunswick Square was built between 1795 and 1802 by James Burton and named after Caroline of Brunswick, the Prince Regent's (later George IV) wife. The area was badly damaged during WWII and has been extensively rebuilt, with the garden being restored to its 18th century appearance and the railings replaced. Russell Square is named after the surname of the Earls and Dukes of Bedford, who developed the family's London landholdings in the 17th and 18th centuries. The houses were the work of builder James Burton (1761-1837), the most successful developer at that time. The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) has a Japenese-style roof garden designed by Peter Swift and opened in 2001. Woburn Square was named after the Bedford's country estate at Woburn Abbey.

Gordon Square Garden is part of the Bedford Estate and named after Lady Georgiana Gordon who was the second wife of the 6th Duke of Bedford. The garden was designed by the Duke himself. Tavistock Square Garden is also part of the estate and was established at the same time as Russell Square, though not laid out until 1825. The present layout dates from the late 1800s. Cartwright Gardens was originally name Burton Crescent after its builder, James Burton, but was later renamed after Major John Cartwright, whose statue can be found in the centre of the garden. St. Pancras Gardens was the former graveyard of the old St. Pancras church. The gardens were open to the public in 1891 and contains many interesting features. including the Burdett-Coutts memorial sundial.

Camley Street Natural Park is a nature reserve on the banks of the Regent's Canal and was created from derelict land. It opened in 1985 and it was one of Britain's first nature reserves. Culpeper Community Garden is named after the 17th century herbalist Nicholas Culpeper and contains plots tended by local people and groups. It is open daily to the public and the project encourages involvement of many disadvantaged groups, as well as children and young people. St John the Baptist church gardens were originally a graveyard and now include a garden of remembrance. Aske Gardens is on the site of Aske's Hospital which was one of the earliest and grandest almshouses in Shoreditch.

The forecourt of Wesley's Chapel has notable planes and the Wesley memorial with a bronze statute. Behind the chapel is a small graveyard with plain chest tombs and the monument of John Wesley. The are which Bunhill Fields is sited was a site of burials for upwards of a thousand years. Among those buried there are Daniel Defoe and William Blake and his wife, Catherine. St. Joseph's Church garden is a modest tribute to the late Cardinal Basil Hume and was designed by Simon-Peter Stobart.

GMT: Greenwich Meridian Trail

GMT: Greenwich Meridian Trail

You can never have too much chocolate!

You can never have too much chocolate!