Cologne City Walls

Cologne City Walls

Cologne City Walls.png

Today's walk was a wander around the medieval city walls of Cologne, which is one of the oldest German cities. The Ubii, a Germanic tribe, established the first permanent settlement on the site of Cologne in 38 BCE. The Romans called it by the Latin name of Oppidum Ubiorum (literally "Ubii settlement") and in 50 CE it was granted city status and was renamed Colonia Claudia Ara Agrippinensium.

The first fortifications were built between the late 1st and 3rd centuries, but during the Middle Ages (1180) a more spacious semicircular line of fortifications was built. The last extension was the fortress ring in 1815 during the Prussian administration.

Only a few sections of the city wall still exist, much of it was demolished from the 1880s to allow the city to expand beyond it's medieval constraints. It lead to the development of a semicircular urban boulevard, known as the Kolner Ringe (Cologne Ring) which encircles the old town to the south, west and north and allowed Cologne to become an industrial city.

Out of the twelve gates only three still survive; the Eigelsteintorburg (Ebertplatz), the Hahnentor (Rudolfplatz) and the Severinstorburg (Chlodwigplatz).

Distance: around 5 miles.

Dusseldorf Loop

Dusseldorf Loop

Cologne Loop

Cologne Loop